When parents can manage their personality clashes and set aside any other differences they have to raise their children together after divorce, a nesting arrangement might work.

Nesting involves keeping and sharing the family home, usually temporarily, after divorce. So, instead of having your children move back and forth between two homes, parents will take turns living in the family home to take care of their children. This type of living situation can be benefit both children and co-parents. This is because it can slow down the harsh changes that usually follow a divorce, reduce divorce-related stress and help you better cater to your children’s needs.

Setting new routines

When parents separate, children have to make a lot of adjustments to their daily routines. The predictable nature of routines can make children feel more secure and learn how to be more independent. From bedtime routines to getting ready for school, you can have your children replicate daily habits in two homes at some point. But nesting can get children used to living with one parent at a time before implementing the idea of moving or living in two homes.

Reducing divorce-related stress

Just as adults need to take time to process the ins and outs divorce, it can be overwhelming for children too. Some children don’t cope well with having less contact with parents, while many kids find moving to a new home or switching schools to be tough. Taking time with making small and large life changes after divorce, can help prevent behavioral, mental health or academic performance problems.

Finding your groove

Trying to sell the family home or finding a new permanent residence takes time. Nesting can allow parents to be more present by minimizing the amount of priorities they tackle all at once. Plus, healthy child-parent relationships often begin when parents are present both physically and mentally.

Nesting can provide a vital stepping stone for life after divorce.